Greetings from Melbourne, Australia.

I can’t prove it but I believe that the way we execute the precepts of project management is, at least to some degree, determined and influenced by our cultural surroundings.

Melbourne is, by all accounts, a fantastic cosmopolitan city. It is a place where people of diverse and different backgrounds, cultures and nationalities have come together and call this place ‘home’.

While the ‘hard’ aspects of project management (in which I mean to include the core techniques used by most project management methodologies) are fairly universally implemented, it is in the ‘soft’ aspects that people of differing backgrounds will differ from one another.

Using a bit of an extrapolation from my experience in the Southern Hemisphere (both in New Zealand and Australia) I would be happy to suggest that the management style exhibited in these countries is by far different than the one illustrated in American based movies and TV series. This is equally manifested in the area of project management where the need to deliver is complemented by a ‘fair go’ approach.

On a different front, just like the rest of the world, Australia is always quick to adopt current and innovative management ideas. In recent years the ‘migration’ to agile and agility is taking hold in many organizations. And just like other countries, Australia too is undergoing a transition from a bottom-up to a top-down drive for implementing agility across the organization. This, however, is not a seamless or easy journey and many companies are in the process of finding their own way and inventing their own path in that transformation effort.

 While I live and work in Melbourne, I have access to the vast knowledge base, experience and stories produced on a regular basis around the world. The ability to listen, read and collaborate with people from all over the world makes the geographical separation that much less important. The use of social media tools enables me to connect with other like minded individuals at any time and in any place and I can’t wait to see what other technologies will come our way in years to come to make such interactions and collaborations even easier.

About “#PMFlashBlog – Project Management Around the World”: This post is part of the second round of the #PMFlashBlog where over 50 project management bloggers will release a post about their view of project management in their part of the world. 

Related Post

Letter to a Young Project Manager Dear L.J. We have barely met and had only the brief and passing opportunity to exchange a mere few words before a daunting and sombre thought enter...
The First Ever PM FlashBlog is Coming to a Blog Ne... Over the past couple of weeks I have been in touch with dozens of project management related bloggers to organize the first ever coordinated blogging ...
The Ten Commandments of Project Management Over the years I've seen many attempts to construct the "10 commandments of project management". I believe there is an element of cheekiness in this a...
The Secret to Clearing the PMP Certification Exam ... The Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) The PMBOK, published by the PMI, is a compilation of the project management guidelines to be adopted...

Related Post

Letter to a Young Project Manager Dear L.J. We have barely met and had only the brief and passing opportunity to exchange a mere few words before a daunting and sombre thought enter...
The First Ever PM FlashBlog is Coming to a Blog Ne... Over the past couple of weeks I have been in touch with dozens of project management related bloggers to organize the first ever coordinated blogging ...
The Ten Commandments of Project Management Over the years I've seen many attempts to construct the "10 commandments of project management". I believe there is an element of cheekiness in this a...
The Secret to Clearing the PMP Certification Exam ... The Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) The PMBOK, published by the PMI, is a compilation of the project management guidelines to be adopted...

The PMFlashBlog event has been, for me, an awesome experience. it demonstrated the simple fact that with concentrated focus great results can be achieved in a relatively short period of time.

Since the official release on Sep 25th I’ve had the opportunity to review all 70 participating posts. My objective in this review was to identify, in each post, the key sentence, paragraph, or words that appeal to me the most or those representing my understanding of the key message arising for that post.

The list below represents those key points I have taken from each post. It is possible that in some instances the comment needs to be looked at in the context of the surrounding paragraphs so feel free to use the provided links to return to the original post for further elaboration.

So here we go:

Any Art is meaningless if you cannot apply it to your everyday life in addition to its intended purpose!

I have been blogging on project management since – holy cow – 2005. You would think by now that I would have this question answered. And once upon a time I did. And then I learned more and I didn’t again. And then I learned more, and I was able to answer the question again. And today I am not so sure.  The lessons are never ending, but there are probably a few fundamental truths at the heart of it.

In one way or another, we all have something to do that requires coming up with a plan, getting the necessary resources scheduled and completing out the work.

Project management is, in essence, a means to an end. It’s about delivering stuff. Creating new business outcomes. New futures. That’s one of the reasons why projects can be so motivating. Outcomes usually outlive the projects that created them in the first place. That’s how it should be. Children should outlive their parents. It’s the natural order of things in both projects and life.

However (as Ferris Bueller points out) life moves pretty fast. Spend the best years of your life blindly running projects, being a slave to PRINCE2, and you could miss it. The last thing you want in life is to reach the final destination and to realise you didn’t care for the journey much.

The lot of a project manager is not an easy one. They have more in common with project managers in other organisations than they do with employees in their own. They share common burdens. They don’t completely fit in with the organisational structure, but they are absolutely and completely necessary. To a certain extent their work is unplannable and hard to control, but they are expected to plan and be in control. They work in a world of largely guessed at estimates, yet they are held accountable to budgets. They can be paid good money, but work is not always guaranteed. They can be deemed as responsible, but often have little decision-making power. And when they are able to make decisions, how should the project manager know what the right or good decision is? What decision-making framework should they use? Should it be what’s right for the project, or what’s right for the organisation, or what’s right for the client, or what’s right for themself and their career? Should it be a combination of these or just one? The project manager lives in a world of tensions and dilemmas.

Better Projects: Kelsey on “What does project management mean to me?” #PMFlashBlog

As a project manager on an Agile software development project, your job is not command and control, but is truly that of the servant leader, you play a key role as a facilitator between the team and business and are an integral enabler of the team’s success.

If you get to the destination, but no one was willing to move with you, you lost.

They didn’t teach me that in my PM training. That projects are people and that’s where the gold is. Maybe Oscar Wilde was right in saying that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught. I’ve learned a lot from projects and the people I’ve had the privilege of meeting along the way, but I still know next to nothing. This could take a lifetime!

Luckily I’m a project manager, and it’s my life’s work.

I’m a big believer and supporter of project management as a discipline
Project manager’s understand that the  execution part of the project is the easy part. Planning and preparing for a project is time consuming. But when the planning and preparation is done well because critical elements like resource loading, risk management,  and communication plans, to name a few, were examined, it sets the team up for smoother project execution.

To many, project management conjures up visions of plans & planning, risks & issues, reporting, tracking etc. – all important tools, techniques, methods and processes. But for me, project management is about people. People deliver projects, to people, for people and impacting people.

If you cannot be trusted in the face of risks and issues, you cannot be trusted with the project. For one thing is certain, projects are full of risks and issues.

As PMs we cannot avoid the inevitable, or avoid events in the projects. However, we can change our attitude to reality. In this, each and every one of us as PMs are responsible for our attitude. Each and every of us have an opportunity every day to confront reality with a construction and positive attitude.

But most of all, projects remind us that human efforts are not a zero sum.  Projects show us that together we can add more than we take.
Project management to me is the science of effectively changing the world.

What does project management mean to me?  I can answer that in two words:

Shared commitment.

We project managers can help the developing nations to upgrade products and services using the same global standard, the PMBOK, as the more developed nations.  Using our craft, we can help this world become a better place through the projects we undertake and the value of successfully completing them.

I have never been tempted to change career, I have been content in this profession and striving for perfection in it from day 1, sure I have moved across industries, but always staying within the scope of project management

Self-actualization – that’s what project management means to me. And I get there by leading teams of talented individuals to create the right deliverables in order to fulfill the dreams of the involved stakeholders.

Project Management taught me that the most important skill in life is the capacity to learn. I get the opportunity to deal with new people, new experience, and new challenges. And with each challenge, I get to test how low or high my ceiling of complexity is. That is how much ambiguity and uncertainty my central nervous system can cope with, before I feel loss of control. I get to learn about who I am and what I am capable of. But more importantly, with every project I get to learn how to continue to raise the ceiling.

During early days of Agile, there were debates challenging the role of a PM in Agile projects, however, now it has become a reality that PMs are needed to handle the “admin” tasks. The prime reason being, they know how to “get things done” in any situation. Large companies implementing complex Agile projects still have dedicated project managers, but they don’t interfere much with day to day running of projects.

Remember, when you close this page, do not think friendships are cheap. Take care of them, there is always something to learn, and you will be rewarded.

the true art of Project Management shines through when we connect with our teams and stakeholders, helping them see possibilities and transforming the way that they live and work.

It’s been about the future.  And ultimately, that’s what project management means to me: an opportunity to help create the future.
We stand, every day, upon the shoulders of teams of giants.  As a project manager, I am humbled by the opportunity to offer up my shoulders to the future.

I get meaning from working programs (as we say) for the program’s success.
This success can be simple – it worked as we planned. Or it can be more complex
having a customer say to a large crowd, this program would not have been a success without you and your team.

Inspired by some pictures from Gilbert Garcin I found on the web, I will visualize and explain some characteristics of the ideal project manager and than the answer will be in your hands. Do we have them?

Thanks of Project Management I have many good friends around the world.

For me, project management is logically organizing your world in the interest of accomplishing something. Just that simple.

Knowledge of the PLC/SDLC, but more importantly, the processes behind the processes

Changing people – their knowledge, attitudes and behaviours – is at the heart of project management. Get the people bit right and our project succeeds, get it wrong and we fail to deliver lasting change.

I’ve been managing projects for several years now.  I have sinned often.  And I’ve learned from them.  When I started out, I did what I think most new project managers do.  I was a task master.  I had a Microsoft project plan and it was my bible.

As the years went by and my experience level increased, I learned a few things.  First of all – and most importantly – if the project you deliver to the business people doesn’t provide the value they expect, on time and on budget is meaningless. 

Secondly, if you drive your team into the ground to get a project done by a specified date, you risk losing some or all of your valuable people.  That will make adding value on your next project all the more difficult.

I hope in my lifetime we’ll see project management as a life skill develop and certainly something that every child has access to. Imagine our knowledge economy world in 10 years time if every child is taught how to use these simple techniques; something they’ll be able to practice throughout their school and university years. When they enter the job market after twenty years they’ll have a great skill set that enables them to make things happen in the workplace and any other challenges they face in their lives.

we as Project Manager’s need to continue contributing to the project and knowledge management literature and provide an opportunity to improve project knowledge sharing, and ensure projects achieve success for organizations.

Project Management – an exercise in common sense.

My vision and desire is to see more project managers transform into great project leaders; project leaders who continuously improve and innovate; who partner with their clients with a view to delivering what they need rather than what they want; and who maximize human potential by motivating and inspiring everybody around them to contribute to the project’s overall goal.

The impact for me was to focus on project management as a tool for bringing about change

Project management has always been a journey for me, where I have learned every single day from my work, from my team and from my mentors. It’s been more about people for me than managing work through tools.

for me, project management is the journey required to remove the friction between doing the right thing for my client, the right thing for my team and the right thing for my conscious and to successfully bring the members of this iron triangle to their respective destination

The Project Manager, 2584BC- 2013AD

RIP

It brings excitement when starting something new, as well as satisfaction when bringing a project to successful completion and having formed lasting relationships with the team members.

The conditions over causes argument is yet to make an impact on mainstream practice – particularly in project management. Unfortunately,  those who wrote  the “The Book” (and those who update it) seem to  be unaware that conditions are more important than causes. It is a completely different way of looking at projects, so it may take a while for aficionados of “The Book” to make the change. That said, I’m an optimist so I believe that it  will eventually catch on; it is just a matter of time …

Well, hopefully it means to mean what it means to the business:

A leadership and management wrapping around project activity that adds value (to the business) by delivering predictable results for the business.   

My intent with this is now advocating that fun is what Project Management should mean for Project Managers (although I think I could give it a try sometime). But for me, fun is central.

The excitement that something new is going to be created is a fantastic feeling and this stays with you throughout the project as you focus on the completion. This combined with the achievement of finishing a project makes being a project manager the best job in the world.

Project management, to me, is multi-faceted. There’s a part of it that is about process and there’s a part that’s about dealing with other team members in a human, collaborative way.

Project management is often described as a set of skills or a collection of best practices, and while those descriptions are not incorrect, in reality, project management goes way beyond this. There is an art to managing projects that cannot be developed based purely on best practices, spreadsheets and organizational skills.

Anyhow, hopefully that’s given you an idea about what PM is to me.  Some days are great and others aren’t.  You’ve got to remember that you’re the Rock Star and the Tea Boy, so get in there and make a cuppa.  Mine’s a tea, milk no sugar!!

Whether you’re a credentialed project manager or accidental, the project management community is a place to share, empathise, sympathise, learn, teach, laugh, mentor and be mentored, grow, understand and appreciate diversity, commiserate and celebrate.

It’s being able to think quickly and say sorry, and most of the time, it’s about putting other people’s and company goals above your own professional ambition. But it works out well when the two things align.

The Way is not complex.
Follow the simplest path for it is The Way.  

Be open with your team and they will be open with you.  
Be one with the universe and the universe will be one with you.
The wise project manager is humble, he knows the team does the work.  

He respects and acknowledges the team and they in turn respect and acknowledge him.  
The poor project manager seeks fame, the wise project manager seeks inner peace.  
With fame come problems, with inner peace comes understanding.  
The poor project manager worries about what to do next.  
The wise project manager relishes not doing, when nothing needs to be done.  
Do little, for this is the way of the project manager. 

The truth is I knew I was a true project manager when I realized that my sense of gratification and pride had shifted from doing great work myself to seeing great work created by a team whose path I had carefully tended.

Being PM means carry everything, know everything and find that everything and everyone is okay. And this goes from caring for the environment in which we work, you have coffee, everything is clean or creating employment and generating culture belonging to others to be team’s emotional coach and understanding to each of the way it is, for make the best of all.

People are at the core of what project management is. The glue that holds these people together is relationships. Adhering people to your project to facilitate a beneficial relationship can really mean the difference between dazzling success and dismal failure.

What does project management mean to me?” Simply this: Make informed decisions, gain management support, and know how to deal with the unexpected.

Project Management is a practice for your entire life (personal and professional). It’s like having the ability to change the world.

Mostly importantly though, Project Management is about people. People who come together and work together towards a common goal, and for the Project Manager, this requires the facilitation and leadership to empower these people to carry out the work required, with an increasingly important emphasis on our soft skills to influence.

Well if you want me to give you the ‘glass half empty’ perspective, it’s easy. What project management means to me is a confused discipline where practitioners routinely do really dumb shit in its name.

Project management is about getting the right stuff done right, improving and building trust.

So, what does project management mean to me? That’s where I feel at home! Even if I do not get to meet my fellow project managers very often, I know they are out there. Accomplishing great things by taking the initiative, whatever frustrating politics or bureaucracy they have to deal with.

I look forward to seeing my profession of project management in the hands of those who believe in project management in the future.

Amen to that.

Project Management to me, means avoiding the current trend of turning a project managers job from what could be seen as a pure relationship role back into a project management role; doing the basics and doing them well.

I’m not saying that relationships and politics are not important, or managing stakeholder expectations should be ignored (and at your peril!!), yet so many projects seem to be just about this, and have less focus on leading a team to design and deliver.

Ideas Into Reality

It is time for Project Managers, everywhere, to stand up and take back the leadership role that their organizations need!  Refuse to be reduced to a meeting scheduler! Refuse to be minimized to a scribe!  You are the leader!  You are the hero that your organization needs! You are the last stop before failure or missed opportunity.  Rise up and be a project leader!  You have it in you, I know you do!

Project management is a road movie. And having arrived safely (hopefully), project managers are immediately looking forward to the next trip. The journey is the important part: making things happen.
So that is what project management means to me. Project management is about making things happen, and project managers are people that like to make things happen.

However project management isn’t all doom, gloom and stress. Out of the controlled chaos comes a great feeling of accomplishment and pride when you finish a challenging project, when a team is working well or a client is happy.

In a world dominated by wonderful human and technological achievements – the most amazing modern cities, technology and infrastructure for example, the world faces a myriad of challenges.

Global warming threatens to destroy many of the achievements of the past. Rising sea levels, if left unchecked, will flood many of the world’s great cities. Droughts will cause hunger leading to millions of refugees. Wars between nations will increase as resources get scarcer.

Project managers have a role to play in helping prevent this catastrophe by using that most precious project management skill of all – communication.

It doesn’t matter much to me about the project management framework, or how rigid or freeing the processes are that I use. What matters most to me is how effective I am at helping my team understand the vision of the project and working with their strengths to build a powerful team which will deliver extraordinary value to our customer.

That is what project management means to me…and that is my sermon.

I prefer to believe that the common thread between soldiers, engineers, and project manager is that they are mission oriented people.  We deliver something that has not been delivered before while trying to be on time and controlling cost.

Related Post

Letter to a Young Project Manager Dear L.J. We have barely met and had only the brief and passing opportunity to exchange a mere few words before a daunting and sombre thought enter...
The First Ever PM FlashBlog is Coming to a Blog Ne... Over the past couple of weeks I have been in touch with dozens of project management related bloggers to organize the first ever coordinated blogging ...
The Ten Commandments of Project Management Over the years I've seen many attempts to construct the "10 commandments of project management". I believe there is an element of cheekiness in this a...
The Secret to Clearing the PMP Certification Exam ... The Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) The PMBOK, published by the PMI, is a compilation of the project management guidelines to be adopted...

Peculiar creature is the practice of project management. One can be a geologist, an economist, an engineer, a biologist, a physicist, or – in fact – a master of any domain knowledge imaginable, and yet – at the same time – be also called a project manager. As a matter of fact, you don’t even need to have a team to execute a project. You can very well manage and execute the project on your own. You can manage a project for a large multinational organization and you can manage a project as part of your school assignment. It does not denote size, it does not denote money and it does not denote consequences. It only means a concrete effort, over a prescribed period of time, to achieve a desired output.

Such a short-term that encapsulates so much.

There are many facets to project management. People in the know tell us that project management is a well-defined and well codified discipline. The Project Management Body of Knowledge – the PMBoK – for example, identifies ten knowledge areas, all used in the context of project management. They include Integration, scope, time cost, quality, human resources, communication, risk, procurement and stakeholder management. That’s a mouthful, but is this what project management really all about?

Different people, no doubt, will ascribe different meanings to project management, thus reflecting their personality and life attitudes. For some it might be about SUCCESS. For others about LEADERSHIP. And don’t forget GETTING THINGS DONE, MEETING OBJECTIVES, exercising AUTHORITY and then some.

For me project management is about the JOURNEY and the DESTINATION. It is about the spirit of exhilaration that comes to a climax when attending a well rehearsed play or a wonderfully played music by a well trained orchestra. It is about the build up of emotions that come as a result of the effort associated with building something from nothing. It is the sense of achievement that one feels when, despite all odds, a disaster is averted, issues are being resolved and risks are being thwarted.

But wait, there’s more…

Project management for me is about remaining true to my own values. Resisting the temptation to always swim with the flow. Respecting people’s dignity. Trusting team members to do the right thing. Empowering professionals to do their job. Listening attentively and responding respectfully. Applying due judgement while avoiding procrastination. Demonstrating willingness to compromise my ego in order to learn from my own mistakes. Exhibiting patience and tolerance when mentoring and coaching others.

“Hang on”, I can hear you say, “project management – for you – is just too much. Keep it simple and tell us in one sentence, what does all this mean? What does project management really mean to you?”

(dramatic pause)

“Well”, I would say, “for me, project management is the journey required to remove the friction between doing the right thing for my client, the right thing for my team and the right thing for my conscious and to successfully bring the members of this iron triangle to their respective destination.”

Think about it!

P.S. This post is published as part of a first ever project management related global blogging initiative to publish a post on a common theme at exactly the same time. Seventy Six (76!) bloggers from Australia, Canada, Colombia, Denmark, France, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, UK and the USA have committed to make a blogging contribution and the fruit of their labor is now (literally NOW) available all over the web. The complete list of all participating blogs is found here so please go and check them out!

Related Post

Letter to a Young Project Manager Dear L.J. We have barely met and had only the brief and passing opportunity to exchange a mere few words before a daunting and sombre thought enter...
The First Ever PM FlashBlog is Coming to a Blog Ne... Over the past couple of weeks I have been in touch with dozens of project management related bloggers to organize the first ever coordinated blogging ...
The Ten Commandments of Project Management Over the years I've seen many attempts to construct the "10 commandments of project management". I believe there is an element of cheekiness in this a...
The Secret to Clearing the PMP Certification Exam ... The Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) The PMBOK, published by the PMI, is a compilation of the project management guidelines to be adopted...

Over the past couple of weeks I have been in touch with dozens of project management related bloggers to organize the first ever coordinated blogging flashmob.

The idea is to have a large number of bloggers post an article, in their respective blogs, on the same agreed theme and have them all publish their post at the same date and time.

The theme selected  is “What does project management mean to me – a Project Manager’s sermon” and at the time of writing this post 48 bloggers have already signed-in to this idea.

The image of a sermon was chosen deliberately. It represents an oral delivery where the content is expected to be genuine, convincing, rational and emotional – all required in order to capture the imagination of, and captivate, the audience.

Publication date has now been set to 25/09/2013 @ 01:00GMT and posts will be tagged on social media with #pmFlashBlog.

The list of blogs currently committed to this project is shown below:

 REPORT
Shim Marom Shim Marom
Owner
70 items   9 followers   2 votes   4.9k views

pmFlashBlog Contributors

This is the list of blogs who have committed to join in to the pmFlashBlog initiative.

The list is now closed and no new entries would now be accepted.

*Following the release date (25th Sep) the list will be updated again and blogs who have not released a #pmFlashBlog related post will be removed.

Sep 18, 2013 - agileworld.blogspot.com - 838
Agile World

I am sure many of us are familiar with this message "It works on my system". I recently got the same answer not from a developer but from the customer service team of the popular loyalty card. As a card member, I couldn't login to my account and reached out the customer care team through their Twitter help service.

Sep 18, 2013 - ah-ha-moments.net - 828
Ah-Ha-Moments.Net

My career didn't begin in project management. It took a lot of heartache and many dramatic changes to take me along that career path. Life-changing injuries from the Paddington Train Crash in 1999 drove me to become a master of reinvention and a catalyst for change in areas much further than just my personal life.

Sep 18, 2013 - anyaworksmart.com - 675
AnyaWorkSmart

After my previous posts on Office Politics I got some very interesting reactions from readers. Many of them included the same question: How to be good at Office Politics without getting into unnecessary conflicts? In order to answer this question, we have to understand why engaging in Politics leads to conflicts initially.

Sep 18, 2013 - betterprojects.net - 866
Better Projects

I think this book by Tobias is beautifully written. There is real craftmanship in the prose here. The book is made up of independent self contained stories and reflections on various themes related to the Agile Software Development movement. Each one is a parable seeking to impart some of Tobias' wisdom onto the reader.

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Sep 18, 2013 - arra-pm.com - 894
Blog

Tagged with: getting started, Initiation Posted in Business case, Planning, Project initation, Project organisation, Risk management

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Sep 20, 2013 - pmpartners.co.uk - 866
Blog

Blog posts from PM-Partners. We tackle some of the leading issues within the project management industry, like training (Exam Time: More Firms Are Requiring PMP Test-Taking), consultancy (The Most Misunderstood Project Management Terms, Always a Job for a Project Manager?), and delivery.

Sep 18, 2013 - guerrillaprojectmanagement.com - 723
Blog | Guerrilla Project Management

Dan Pink shares the big ideas in his books A Whole New Mind, Drive, and To Sell is Human on the surprising truth about how to move and motivate others. Dan Pink has written three books that have changed the way I think about motivation and influence.

Sep 18, 2013 - blogramme.com - 761
Blogramme

In 1989 Stephen R. Covery published his seminal work "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People". It's since sold 25m printed copies, 15m audio books, and been translated into 38 languages worldwide. It remains one of the Top 25 business books today.

Sep 18, 2013 - unlikebefore.blogspot.it - 837
Change Through Action

a guest spot on with Robert Kelly and . It's as valid now as it was then so I'm republishing it to trigger thinking and maybe, just maybe, tangible change through action.

Sep 18, 2013 - commsabilities.com - 818
CommsAbilities -

It is impossible to force change on people, though so many project teams try and fail. Their natural reaction is resistance, or lip service and a return to old behaviours when the project ends. Either way, productivity falls, customer service suffers and costs escalate.

Consulting 101

When I started out my IT consulting career, I made sure to read and follow the firm's guidelines.Not that I'm a prodigious goody-two-shoes rule-follower - I can question authority with the best of them.I just wanted to make sure I did a good job and conformed to an acceptable degree.If the firm required me to wear a suit and tie, who was I to fight that?

Sep 18, 2013 - cornerstonedynamics.com - 942
CSD Blog

Thanks to Shim Marom, owner of the quantmleap project management blog for contributing this post to CSD. For the uninitiated the term Project Management might sound like an exotic, uncharted and illusive idea.

DantotsuPM.com

Le rendez-vous des francophones intéressés par le management de projet et le leadership

Sep 18, 2013 - pi3cubed.blogspot.com.au - 752
Delivering change

We need to develop a strong base of skills in middle management More and more companies are being hard pressed to find and retain top talent; coupled with this is the need to put together the right team for the project.

| EarthPM: At the intersection of Green (or even better - Sustainability) and Project Management

We love community learning, collaboration - even between sometimes-competitors. We've written about this before, using GreenTouch.org as an example. What fantastic accomplishments they've achieved, despite being a consortium of customers, competitors, and suppliers. Read about that in previous postings or as covered in one of our presentations.

Sep 18, 2013 - eight2late.wordpress.com - 675
Eight to Late

Introduction Successful management consultants are often seen as experts and trendsetters in the business world. The best among them are able to construct convincing narratives about their expertise and experience, thereby gaining the trust of senior managers in large organisations. Have you ever wondered how they manage to pull this off?

Sep 18, 2013 - freakyprojects.com - 742
freakyprojects.com

DSDM Atern bygger på: Modellen er som du måske vil se (!) meget skalerbar, og kan fungere med både helt små enkle projekter, såvel som store komplekse projekter. Jeg har lavet en lidt fordansket version af DSDM Atern til en større dansk virksomhed, som kan bruges til inspiration og forståelsesramme.

Sep 18, 2013 - hennyportman.wordpress.com - 904
Henny Portman's Blog

I'll be taking part in the first ever project management 'flashblog'. More than 60 project management bloggers will be writing their thoughts on the title 'What does project management mean to me - a Project Manager's sermon'. All blogs will be published simultaneously on 25th September at 1am GMT.

Sep 18, 2013 - herdingcats.typepad.com - 791
Herding Cats

There's a post on a Deltek implementation partner site about applying Earned Value. It has some good advice, but the premise of the starting point needs to be addressed. Before going on to suggest things to do on a project using EVM, it's best to have one of those don't do stupid things on purpose discussions.

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Sep 18, 2013 - pmvstheworld.squarespace.com - 666
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En los últimos meses han entrado 4 personas nuevas a hacer parte de monoku, esto no es algo común en la oficina y al ser una empresa pequeña, nuestro "protocolo de recibimiento" es algo que varía mucho, no es rígido pero tampoco está muy pulido y aunque para mí es agradable que no sea algo cuadriculado, siento que es demasiado importante darle una guía clara de su rol, a cada persona nueva.

How to Manage a Camel - Project Management and Recruitment

Project management and recruitment news from Arras People

Sep 18, 2013 - ivanrivera-pmp.blogspot.mx - 799
Ivan Rivera, PMP

Siguiendo la línea del Post anterior, ahora del blog de ProjectManger vamos a revisar 4 tipos de Informes de Proyectos. El Administrador del Proyecto constantemente escicha una pregunta: ¿Puedo tener ese informe antes del lunes? Tal vez lo pregunta el patrocinador del proyecto o su oficina de proyectos, o un colega.

Sep 18, 2013 - journalofaprojectmanager.blogspot.co.uk - 866
Journal of a Project Manager

It seemed filled with issues.

Sep 29, 2013 - juggling-sand.blogspot.co.uk - 761
Juggling Sand

If you work in the best interests of the organisation, then that will be noticed. People will try to do you over from time to time (think daily) but if you're working in the best interests of the organisation, then they'll be seen for what they are.

Still enough time to join in so if you are interested get in touch!

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